@th hey who ever said charging lithium cells *wasn't* rocket science?

@msh @th the thing is, this isn't even controlling the charging of the lithium cells

this is controlling the supply of power *to the thing that does that*
@msh @th like, figure out what you just plugged in, negotiate with it for how many watts it wants, what voltages it can take, what voltages/currents you can supply, etc.

then the device will have its *own* microcontroller doing the rocket science with what you're giving it

@th

ah, we've come so far. we can waste processing like no other species

@sydneyfalk
Can't wait for the controller to be written in electron. (They'll find a way, i'm sure of it)
@th

@kiri @sydneyfalk @th Yo dawg, I heard you like electrons, so I wrote the electron flow controller in Electron so you...

I'll see myself out.

@nivex @kiri@fosstodon.org @th

Electron: Redefining How Difficult It Will Be To Search For Multiple Things In Multiple Fields

@th @tsturm the question is, can you power the AGC off the charger?

@cinebox @th This was surprisingly hard to google due to the popularity of Apollo 13. The short answer is, you might need at least 10 of these chargers to run the Apollo CSM, and the extension cords are going to be a major pain in the butt. 😜

The CSM had three fuel cells, each able to provide 30 Volts DC at a sustained 1400 Watt, but typically between 500-1000 Watt. The CSM could limp along on a single cell if need be.

@tsturm @th Wikipedia says 55W for the AGC, my USB-C laptop charger can do that

@cinebox @th Oh - just for the computer? Yeah, that sounds about right.

@tsturm @th unfortunately the Apollo DC bus is 30V which is outside the range of USB-PD so I would need a boost converter for the computer

@th This is hilarious. No, it isn't. In fact it's very sad 😔.

😭🤮

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